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News Flash!

Monday, May 9th, 2016

This morning I received yet another IRS scam phone call, from a different area code.  This time I didn’t answer, but the scammer’s robocaller still left a voicemail.

I googled “IRS lawsuit call” and got the following page:

https://www.irs.gov/uac/Newsroom/Phone-Scams-Continue-to-be-a-Serious-Threat,-Remain-on-IRS-Dirty-Dozen-List-of-Tax-Scams-for-the-2016-Filing-Season

Among other things the article mentions 5000 people have been scammed out of a total of over $26 million!  That’s a LOT of money!

 

Excerpted from the article:


The IRS will never:

  • Call to demand immediate payment, nor will the agency call about taxes owed without first having mailed you a bill.

  • Demand that you pay taxes without giving you the opportunity to question or appeal the amount they say you owe.

  • Require you to use a specific payment method for your taxes, such as a prepaid debit card.

  • Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.

  • Threaten to bring in local police or other law-enforcement groups to have you arrested for not paying.

For more, visit “Tax Scams and Consumer Alerts” on IRS.gov.


Another IRS scam phone call

Monday, May 9th, 2016

I received yet another IRS scam call today, from a different number.  I didn’t recognize the number so I let it go to voice mail, but the scammer’s system still left voice mail.  

I did a google on “IRS phone scam” and came up with this from the IRS website:

https://www.irs.gov/uac/Newsroom/Phone-Scams-Continue-to-be-a-Serious-Threat,-Remain-on-IRS-Dirty-Dozen-List-of-Tax-Scams-for-the-2016-Filing-Season

Among other things the article mentions that 5000 victims have paid over $26 million as a result of the scams.

 

Excerpted from the article:

“The IRS will never:
  • Call to demand immediate payment, nor will the agency call about taxes owed without first having mailed you a bill.
  • Demand that you pay taxes without giving you the opportunity to question or appeal the amount they say you owe.
  • Require you to use a specific payment method for your taxes, such as a prepaid debit card.
  • Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.
  • Threaten to bring in local police or other law-enforcement groups to have you arrested for not paying.
 

Bogus IRS phone call

Friday, May 6th, 2016

I received a phone call from 478-279-6895 with a recording stating it was from the IRS and that they were filing suit.

This is a bogus call trying to get you to call them back.  Which I didn’t of course.

My understanding is that IRS does not call to threaten lawsuit.  They send their threats through the US postal.

 

Be careful out there!


Phishing email targeting Wells Fargo customers

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

I just received a phishing email targeting Wells Fargo customers, and thought it might provide a good example of some things to watch out for. This particular phishing email is rather clumsy so there’s several items that stand out as fishy, or phishy if you prefer.  I’ve included a couple photos in the article here.  You can click on the image to see it full size.  Unfortunately for Facebook, the images will not be imbedded.

 

Image2 First of all, notice that the From address is a yahoo address.  Wells Fargo isn’t going to send you an email from a Yahoo address.  It is all too easy to forge the from address, so just because the address looks like it’s from Wells Fargo isn’t a home-free card.  Did I mention this one was clumsy? It appears to me that this message was actually sent from a compromised yahoo account.  
 
The next clue is the wording of the message: “We kindly implore” and “Customer Care Service.”  I suppose if the business was located in the UK, that might be a bit more understandable, but in the US the stilted language is a dead giveaway.  Someone not in the US composed this message.
 
Image1 Finally, if I hover the pointer over the link – hover, not click! – then Outlook at least will show me what the real link is.  You’ll notice that the text of the message makes it look like it’s a Wells Fargo address, but hovering reveals the actual link to point to a different address – “http://tokblast.pw/kwlz”  Although I didn’t click on the link, I’m guessing it would present a page with graphics “borrowed” from Wells Fargo to make you think you were on a Wells Fargo site, and prompt you to log in.  
 
When you try to log in on that website, you give them your bank login information!  Now they can log into your bank account, and transfer all your funds to their account in the Bahamas or wherever.  Nifty, eh?  If you have a line of credit, they can probably also max out your loan, too.  Now you’re not just broke, you’re in debt!
 
Be careful with emails!

 

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